Archive for August, 2010

Springbank Fall Fair

Springbank Layout

Springbank Layout

On Saturday, September 11, I will be showcasing my photographs at the Springbank Fall Fair from 9 am-3 pm at 32224 Springbank Road in Calgary, Alberta.


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I will be presenting 12 of my most popular photos on diamond-gloss, metallic canvas which need to be seen to be believed!   Also on display will be a portfolio and multimedia presentation of my other exceptional images.  Additionally, I will be drawing for a beautiful 12×18 canvas and giving away a limited number of fridge magnets developed for this event.

Come by, visit my display and enter to win this ready to display 12×18 canvas print.

Show Give Away!

Show Give Away!

Also be sure to pick up one of the following magnets developed for this event.  Supplies are limited so arrive early!

Castle Mountain Magnet

Castle Mountain Magnet

Blondie Magnet

Blondie Magnet

Moraine Lake Magnet

Moraine Lake Magnet

Moss Bear Magnet

Moss Bear Magnet

Emerald Lake Magnet

Emerald Lake Magnet


Bundle of Joy Edition

Nursery

Nursery

Crib

Crib

The past several months have been busy preparing for our first bundle of joy and the newest Fisher addition.  My wife thankfully did research during the day to be sure that we didn’t bring home any lead coated, choking hazards, which left our evenings for shopping, painting and assembling.  With the recent delivery of the majority of our selected nursery furniture, the space really started taking shape with the exception of bare walls.

Baby Wildlife Collection

Baby Wildlife Colleciton

To address the issue, I dug deep into my collection of images and developed a series of baby friendly photos that showed the softer, cuddlier side of Nature.  I had each of the selected photos finished in Diamond Gloss Canvas and have hung the first three above the crib.

To complete the room, we are still awaiting the elusive dresser that we ordered nearly 10 weeks ago but have been assured will be delivered this week.  Once the final piece of furniture is delivered my wife and I will reassess the space and select several more prints to finish the room until the last piece comes home from the hospital!

New Product – Metallic, Diamond-Gloss, Canvas

Canvas Gallery Wrap

Canvas Gallery Wrap

Gallery Wrap Corner

Gallery Wrap Corner

In an effort to offer a beautiful, finished product at an exceptional value, Casey Fisher Photography is proud to now offer Metallic Diamond-Gloss Canvas Gallery prints.

During production, the image is reproduced on canvas with a metallic finish, for rich, shimmering color and a nearly 3D effect, before being stretched over a frame and coated with a diamond-gloss finish.  The result is a finished, ready to hang, product without the necessity for custom framing.

I was so enthused with the results from my trial run of canvas products that I have ordered an additional fifteen canvases to be featured as my sole representation at an upcoming show and for my own collection.

Visit Casey Fisher Photography, if you are looking for a stunning print at an exceptional value, when compared to custom framing.  Please allow up to 6 weeks for delivery as the product is complex to produce but well worth the wait!

Motherly Love

Brown Bear Sow and Cub

Brown Bear Sow and Cub

Of the many great memories from my Alaska adventure, my fondest involves a brown bear sow and her three year old cub. As our group came to a clearing overlooking a small pool, at the junction of two rivers, we found several bears splashing through the river in pursuit of salmon.

On the opposite bank of the narrow river, a sow and its cub cautiously approached the pool and continued up to the elevated safety of a large uprooted tree. The sow’s caution was warranted because there were several large boars in the area, which will kill cubs. Occasionally, the sow would venture off its perch with its cub in tow to fish, before promptly returning to their refuge atop of the fallen tree to eat. Every time a boar would patrol the river, in the vicinity of the pair, the cub would lean in tight to its mother and peer over her back.

During one patrol, a boar took an interest in the pair and began to approach until the sow stood, shielding its cub and let loose a roar that sent a chill down my spine. The boar wisely moved on in a search of easier prey, much to my relief. The sense of peril for the cub, followed by the protective actions of a loving mother, willing to put herself in danger, made this the most special of the many experiences I had on this trip.

Alaska Adventure

Tenakee Springs Shoreline

Tenakee Springs Shoreline

In 2009, I was given the opportunity to join a small group to photograph coastal brown bears and whales near Tenakee Springs, a remote village on Chichagof Island in Southeast Alaska.  From Juneau, I boarded a 50 year old float plane for a noisy, 40 minute flight before a bumpy landing on Tenakee Inlet.  Once on solid ground, we walked the main street, which was a narrow dirt path only suitable for bicycle or ATV traffic, to begin the 2 km hike through old growth rain forest to our secluded accommodations.

Our cabin was rustic to say the least, having no electricity or running water but it was a hard-walled shelter in a remote, bear-infested wilderness. Electricity for charging gear was provided via a solar cell, fresh water came from a spring behind the cabin and headlamps were our only source of illumination at night.

Humpback Tail in Tenakee Inlet

Humpback Tail in Tenakee Inlet

Each day we would rise early, don our rubber boots and hike to the village harbor where we had arranged for a local carpenter to ferry us to and from our shooting location. Our driver would drop us off and promptly push off to return to Tenakee and his day job, only to return later in the day.

Throughout the week, we had extraordinary conditions for photographing wildlife thanks to smoke from a large forest fire burning in the Yukon that filtered out the harsh light of midday allowing us to shoot all day. Unfortunately, that same smoke make for lackluster landscape photos that I had hoped to capture, demonstrating bears in their Alaskan wilderness.

Brown Bear in Kadashan River

Brown Bear in Kadashan River

During our adventure, I was witness to many natural wonders including a Humpback whale repeatedly breaching on the Chatham Strait, having first-year brown bear cubs make a brief appearance before scampering back into the protection of the forest, witnessing the showdown between a boar and a sow protecting her cub and having a large boar charging directly towards my unprotected position and diving into a shallow pool at my feet in an attempt to catch salmon.  The photos and full accounts of the above experiences will be released across several portfolio and blog updates in the weeks to come.

Brown Bear Cub Prints

Brown Bear Cub Prints

The adventure surely would not be for everyone as we each conservatively walked 80 km in rubber boots over a 6 day period, carrying 40 lbs of photography gear over rough terrain. Despite buying and breaking in the best rubber boots before departing, I can surely say that rubber boots are not ideal for walking long distances and it took several weeks for my feet to mend themselves following the adventure.

The lack of amenities and some personal discomfort aside, I would return to Alaska in a second, given the opportunity. There is something about seeing coastal brown bears in their natural habitat, away from the pressures of some of the more tourist friendly destinations that was very special to me. To be in close proximity, at times as close as 15 feet, to these apex predators and feel at ease was an amazing experience.

I had considered a return visit to Alaska this season but due to previous commitments and the fact that, a year later, I am still working on photos from my first visit I decided to look closely at 2011.

Grizzly Attitude

Grizzly Bear

Grizzly Bear Emerging from the Bush

In the early Spring, I was getting the itch to find some bears and had heard reports of recent sightings in Kootenay National Park so I packed up in the middle of the night and headed out to try my luck.

Driving for hours, I had seen only a couple moose and a black bear, all of which quickly disappeared into the trees.  I had considered ending my search for the day when  suddenly, out of the corner of my eye, I saw a dark speck along the Kootenay River.  I almost dismissed it as my imagination because after hours of scanning for wildlife you begin seeing many bear-shaped stumps and rock-shaped bears.

I brought my car to a stop and walked back to a clearing that gave me views of the riverbed and could see a dark, round form protruding from a small grouping of trees which seemed static.   I looked through my 400mm lens and still could not determine what it was until it finally began to move.

From behind the trees came a large grizzly bear which ambled its way down river towards my position, stopping every so often to dig up roots of small shrubs.  Generally a bear sighting, especially a grizzly bear, draws huge crowds but for 45 minutes cars continued to pass oblivious to the bear.

Despite the duration of the encounter, I knew that I had few decent images because the grizzly had its head buried the majority of the time as it fed on roots.  Only occasionally did the bear glance up in my direction and it seemed relaxed and did not display any of the classic signs of stress.

Grizzly Attitude

The last photo I took before the grizzly charged. You can see that this bear was getting an attitude.

While shifting in my position I broke a branch and suddenly the bear spun around and took three quick bounds in my direction before coming to an abrupt halt.  The bear then left no question that it had tolerated my presence long enough as it swatted the ground, huffed loudly and stood up on its hind legs.  I slowly backed out of my position with my heart in my throat until the bear was out of sight before backtracking to my vehicle.

This was the first and only wildlife encounter where I felt endangered and it gave me much more appreciation for a bear’s speed, agility and power.  I have become more wary for future sightings after seeing how abruptly this bear’s temperament changed.

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